The Flynn surname can also be found in Clare, Cork, Kerry, and Roscommon. It is a Scottish name, common here since the Plantation. The Síl Colla Uais descend from Colla Uais, one of the Three Collas. Clann Ceallaigh descend from Cellach, son of Tuathal, king of the Uí Chremthainn, who in turn was descended from Daimine, one of the sons of Cairpre Dam Argait, and are part of the Síl Daim Argait. The Uí Briúin Bréifne, or O'Brien Breffny, are a branch of the Uí Briúin kin-group. Origins in Ulster: Scottish and English Plantation. This name, which for the past two centuries has been found in south Down and the north Louth area, appears near there as early as 1428 when Thomas Curragh a farmer, of Kilpatrick, was mentioned in a case recorded in Archbishop Swayne's register. There were MacWilliams or Williamsons, a sept of Clan Gunn, who descended from a later chief of the clan called William. Including a few for the synonyms Ewings and Ewin, while in 1890 the number was 24, in both cases almost entirely in Ulster. It gave rise to a host of surnames including Williamson and Williams but by far the most common was Williams. They originate from lands of Whiteside in Lanarkshire. This “ Adams” family were early settlers in Cavan. De Bard also appears in the following century in Aberdeenshire and the Lothians. The O'Ferrys were followers of the MacSweeneys. In the 'census' of 1659 Donnellson appears as a 'principal name' in Co. Antrim (see Connell, MacDonald and MacDonnell). "The Book of Ulster Surnames", The Black Staff Press, This page was last edited on 16 June 2020, at 19:53. For example, the Irish name Ó Flaithbheartaigh is Anglicised as Flaherty, Flaffery and Flaverty in Connacht, however due to the aspiration of the 'F' in Ulster Irish, it is Anglicised and recorded as Laverty and Lafferty in Ulster thus the F variants have been excluded. Related to the Montgomerys they arrived in Ulster from Kilmarnock when Sir Thomas Boyd of Bedlay was granted 1500 acres of Seein in the Barony of Strabane Co Tyrone. Very numerous: Mainly Ulster, also Waterford, Offaly etc. The leader of the men of Surrey in AD 853 was “Huda”. In Ireland it has been mainly associated with Co. Derry from the seventeenth century to the present day. Some Highland MacWatts translated their name to Watson. Many can be found in the 1631 muster rolls in Ardstraw and Castlederg. Smyth (9802) 8. The Fír Lemna (also known as Uí Tuathail and Síl Tuathail) are cited as being one of the "Trí Tuatha of Oirghialla" alongside the Uí Chremthainn and Síl Dubthir. Another branch of this family from Cumberland close to the Scottish borders resettled in Co Monaghan. In Ireland, apart from a few MacCurdys in Co. Derry, the name is found exclusively in Co. Antrim, as is MacMurtry. These families can sometimes also be found as McGibbon or McKibbon. Other MacRobbs of Callander and Kilmadock in Perthshire were also early settlers. It is speculated that Breffny derives its name from a pre-Celtic substrate language spoken in Ireland meaning 'ring' or 'loop', therefore making Breifne one of the oldest placenames in Ireland, dating prior to 500 B.C.[1]. This probably derives from the personal name Fearadhach, meaning 'manly'. It is common too in the Glens and on the north coast of Antrim, to which it probably came with the Stewarts when they arrived at Ballintoy, having lost their lands in Bute in the mid-sixteenth century. A common name in Tyrone, this family were from the Scottish Borders known for centuries as the “Bellis” of Annandale Dumfriesshire. This was very common in the Lowlands. English and Welsh people were also involved with the Plantation of Ulster, and so their surnames can be found among Ulster Scots. The traditional territory of the Uí Briúin Bréifne was known as the kingdom of Bréifne, which included the modern Irish counties of Leitrim and Cavan, along with parts of County Sligo. The Uí Meic Uais are cited as having several branches; Yet the following are cited by Francis Byrne as being collectively known as the Uí Meic Uais, though groups of this name are also noted in the midland regions: The Uí Tuirtri descend from Fiachu Tort, a son of Colla Uais. In this case the name is territorial in origin, many of the Scottish Bairds descending from Normans who came to Scotland in the train of William the Lion in the twelfth century. Forde has been widely used in the anglicisation of several native Irish families The prefix O' is now used only in Co. Derry, and there rarely. Murphy (8048) 12. in 1558 and thus began a long and bitter feud between the two families. In Gaelic it is spelled Mac Shitrig “ son of Sitric” or “Sitrig” meaning “true victory” Top 100 Irish Surnames & Last Names (Family Names Ranked) The Top 20 Irish Surnames and Meanings. Scottish, from the personal name Gilbert. A metathetic form of the family name Turnbull. For example, the common Ulster and west Highland surname of Campbell, most times this is the anglicised form of Caimbeul from the well-known Argyll family. In the fifteenth century the MacKurerdys, as they were then called, owned most of Bute. Ulster surnames making their mark from the Apollo to the White House From Neil Armstrong to Steven Bannon - the Irish literally are everywhere! Source: Matheson, Special Report on Surnames in Ireland. Though most in Fermanagh, South Tyrone would be of this origin at least one prominent family claims decent from a settler from Cornwall. Gallagher (11739) 3. It is also well known in Dublin. Some of the Irish sept of O'Hagan (see O'Hagan) may have further anglicised their name to Aiken. There were five William Somervilles in succession the last dying in 1282. This Co. Antrim and Co. Down name is Scottish in origin and can derive from the Gaelic word bard, a 'bard' or 'poet'. The family has it’s origins in the lowlands of Scotland where it is most common in Paisley and Glasgow. Welcome to Ulster Ancestry Genealogy, family history and probate research in Northern Ireland Family History & Genealogy Research Reports . (also originally from Donegal). Like Hays it is often used as an anglicisation of the old Irish name O’ hAodha “decendant of Hugh”. These Free Pages are provided to help you with your Research. Origins : Early anglo Irish or post plantation Like many similar tales the story may have been made to fit the name rather than the reverse. Wilson (11369) 4. Fitzgerald (9798) 6. The Boyds decend from Robert Stewart one of two Norman brothers who founded the Royal Stuart dynasty in Scotland. It is more common in Co. Antrim than elsewhere and most will be of English or Welsh origin. Years before the Three Collas founded Airgíalla, Colla Uais ruled as king of Ireland until he and his brothers and three hundred followers were exiled to Scotland. In Ireland common only in Ulster, Aiken is of Scottish origin. The Scottish name MacWard, Gaelic Mac a'Bhaird, meaning 'son of the bard', was also largely anglicised to Baird. A Scottish family better known as “Gillies” from “Servant of Jesus”. The family name derives from Hamilton in Larnarkshire. Or, take Jefferson Davis, the Scot Irish president of the Confederate States of America. There were also Williamsons in Caithness, a sept of Clan Mackay. No less than six of the original fifty Scottish undertakers of the Plantation were Hamiltons. The Foundation has online records and publications available to help you discover your Irish and Scots-Irish ancestors. Ellison “ son of Ellis”  are a family from Berwickshire. Smith (8314) 11. Little is known about the origins of the name. In the mid-nineteenth century a particular concentration of the name was noted to the north of Dromore, in the barony of Lower Iveagh in Co. Down. In Dungannon MacKeever and McIvor can both be found together. There were McIlvar septs of Clans Campbell Robertson and MacKenzie. The Morrisons of Lewis and Harris,kinsmen of the McLeods, had for years fought a bitter feud with their neighbours the McAuleys of Lewis over water rights. However the name was also common in the Outer Hebrides ,families having settled there originally from Donegal. The redistribution of escheated lands after the defeat of the Ulster Gaelic lords and the 'Flight of the Earls' in 1607. The Loiges, another branch of the Cruitin, live in the midlands. The two principal families of Uí Briúin Bréifne were the O'Rourkes and O'Reillys, who after a great battle in 1256, split the kingdom into East Bréifne and West Bréifne. This surname is numerous in counties Armagh and Antrim. As with many of the “Gille” names derives from “Servant or devotee of Mary”. Airthir (barony of Lower and Upper Orior), meaning 'east', was one of the main branches of the Síl Fiachra Cassán until the 8th century when it split into the main septs of the Uí Nialláin, the Uí Bressail, and the Uí Echdach. The name, as Gourlay or Gourlie, is also well known in Scotland and there it is territorial in origin, probably from a place of the name in England. In the mid-nineteenth century it was found to be particularly popular on the Upper Ards around Portaferry, Co. Down. century records of Lanark. Many Ewing wills are recorded for the dioceses comprising these northern areas. century Yorkshire from the town of Roos . For example, take Andrew Jackson, one of the Scot Irish American presidents. In Co. Antrim, where it is most popular, it was found to be most concentrated in the area northwest of Ballymena in the mid-nineteenth century. The top 20 most common surnames in Dublin. Ferry, also spelt Fairy, is found almost exclusively in Co. Donegal, and is an anglicisation of the old Cenél Conaill sept name Ó Fearadhaigh. Particularly in Co. Down both these names have been made Fivey in the mistaken notion that the Gaelic for 'five' cúig, was an element in their construction. The plantation of Ulster in the 17th century led to many Scottish people settling in Ireland. In Ireland very few of Blairs live outside Ulster where over half are from Co. Antrim and most of the remainder from counties Derry and Tyrone. They are a branch of the MacMahons of Oriel, forst noted as Sliocht Ardghail Mhóir Mhic Mathúna, 'the stock of Ardghal Mór MacMahon', who was chief of the MacMahons from 1402 to 1416. The MacMonagles are numerous in Co. Donegal and in the city of Derry and those found elsewhere have their origin there. It is likely the Macilmories who settled in Ulster were actually Macilmorrows from Ballantrae Parish where the name was also found as McElmurro, McElmurre and Macilmurry around 1600. Around 1900 Donaldson was being used interchangeably with Donnelly (see Donnelly) in parts of the Coleraine district of Co. Derry. The Dumfriesshire name Kirkhoe, now rare, also became Kirk. Macilmorie is from the Scottish Gaelic Macgiolla Mhuire The family as either M’Ilmorie or M’Kilmorie were found in Rothesay in medieval times. As a noun it is used to denote the Irish language, as an adjective to denote native Irish as opposed to Norman or English origin. In the Monaghan Hearth Money Rolls of 1663 it appears as O'Hessan. Some Donegal McDaids (the sept of Max Daibheid) kinsmen to the Dohertys anglicised to Davison in that County and also in Tyrone and Derry. It is in Ireland a variant of the Norman name de la Haye . In 1315 King Robert 1 confirmed on Thomas (Dickson) son of Richard the barony of “Symundestone” in Lanark. It was recorded as being used interchangeably with Eakins in Belfast, Ekin in counties Derry and Donegal, Ekin in Co. Donegal and Egan in Co. Down. The early-eighteenth-century Gaelic poet James MacArdle was of the Fews district. This name is an English toponymic derived from a place in Northumberland. The origin of the name is interesting. The mass migration which occurred during the 17th centurygovernment-sponsored Plantation scheme was to have a massive impact on Ulster. Although there is confusion between the Farleys of Blackwatertown and the Irish Farrelly family ,a Breffny family whose territory was in the barony of Loughter in County Cavan ,it seems these Blackwater “Farleys “were in fact Fairleys a family of English adventurers who had arrived in Ireland with Cromwell. In the 19th century it is reported that in one village in Banffshire inhabitated by 300 people no less than 225 had the surname Watt. Stevene de Kilpatric del counte is found in Dunfreiss in 1296 Summerville aka. The Uí Méith territory spanned northern County Louth, eastern County Armagh, and later in County Monaghan. Often surnames are a giveaway. In the fourteenth century a branch migrated to the Glens of Antrim and settled at Crebilly near Ballymena. Write these names in … Johnston (10602) 7. The main families were of Cantray in Inverness-shire and of Tullock in Perthshire. The O'Hamills ruled a territory in south Tyrone and Armagh and from the twelfth century were poets and ollovs (learned men) to the powerful O'Hanlons. He was a United Irishman and a series of letters he published under the title Billy Bluff and Squire Firebrand drew the attention of the government. John De Kelly was Abbot of Arbroath in 1373. For a time the Cenél Eóghain and Cenél Conaill alternated as kings of the Northern Uí Néill until the 8th century. There are several in the Co. Donegal Hearth Money Rolls of 1665 (one appearing, presumably by error, as O'Monigal). According to the books of Lecan and Ballymote, the Síl Ciarain Uí Echach were located in Airthir. The Cianachta Glenn Geimin of Clann Cian, or the Cianachta of Glengiven, ruled a region now known as Dungiven. This Co. Antrim name is of Scottish origin. “Famous “or Noble” This name was known in the home counties of England in the middle ages. Origins in Ulster: English and Scottish Plantation. Williams was never common in Scotland which retained the longer Williamson. Only counties Donegal, Derry, Tyrone, Armagh, Fermanagh and Cavan were actually 'planted', portions of land there being distributed to English and Scottish families on their lands and for the building of bawns. Origins in Ulster:  Old Irish, later Scottish Plantation. Probably from the old English personal name Leodgeard or from the office of “legate” an ambassador, a delegate etc. Lyness, with its variant spellings, Lynas, Lynass, Lynis, is a numerous name in counties Antrim and Down today. Adam Legate rendered his accounts to the Bailie of Sterling in 1406 and later became a burgess of the same town. The most famous of the name in Ulster was a Presbyterian minister, the Revd James Porter, 1753-98, of Greyabbey, Co. Down. taking their name from the Parish of Keir near Sterling. Strange though it seems Lynas or Lyness has been recorded in recent times as in use in the Newry area as a synonym of MacAleenan. There were O'Quigleys, a sept of the Uí Fiachra of Co. Mayo, and another sept of Inishowen in Donegal. From the personal name possibly from Saint Martin,it is the name of a once great family of East Lothian This is the earliest sighting of the namw which later was to evolve as McKittrick. Like their compatriats the Nobles were scattered by James and fled to Fermanagh to rejoin the Elliotts, Armstrongs and Johnstons. Therefore some at least of the Ulster Gourleys may have Scottish roots. Very numerous: all areas, especially Ulster and Galway-Mayo. A number of Ulster Scots also have surnames which are of indigenous Irish origin. IF. The majority of the Lowland Scottish families are from Ayrshire, Lanarkshire, and Gallowayshire, and most of these families migrated to Ireland during the Ulster Plantation (1609-1720). Ir. T.H. Scottish American writer Robert Black gives a romantic origin for the Turnbull name. This name is equally common in Ulster, Leinster and Connacht, its main centres being Dublin, Co. Sligo and Co. Antrim. Murphy (23511) 3. The Raineys and Rennys were extensive land owners in the district of Craig in Angus from the middle of the 15th century. Aiken – Aiken . The Uí Tuírtri territory would expand into the lands north of Lough Neagh as they were driven eastwards by the Northern Uí Néill about the 10th century. Today a growing number of people feel the need to seek out their family roots and ancestry here in Ireland. The name is also well known in Co. Sligo and other parts of Connacht. Across the North Channel, MacCurdy is a well-known Rathlin name, having been for centuries the most common name on the island. Thousands stayed on in Ireland, replacing those who had departed thus expanding the Ulster gene pool to encompass families from all over Scotland. The name is also found as Rollstone and Rowlston. Griffith's Griffith's Valuation is a mid-nineteenth century property survey showing who lived where in Ireland between 1847 and 1864. The surname origin of English surnames such as Bingham, Mitchell, Shaw and Turner are just some examples of derived northern Irish last names commonly found in northern Ireland. Ross has possible origins in both Scotland and England. Quigley is an Irish surname that has been prevalent in the Emerald Isle since the 16th century. Kirk was also noted as synonymous with Kirkpatrick around Coleraine and Limavady in Co. Derry at the start of the twentieth centry (see Kirkpatrick). The Highland name MacWilliam was also anglicised as Williamson (see MacWilliams). The Ramsays are reputed to have originated in Huntingdonshire where Ramsay is a local name .The first to be recorded in Scotland is Simund de Ramesie It can be or several origins Irish Scottish or English. In Ireland, however, Dane is primarily the name of a Connacht sept Ó Déaghain. The exact origins of this family are complicated when one takes into account the large numbers of both Irish and Scottish septs who share the names Johnston and Johnson. Scottish settlers, mainly Presby… All Content is Copyright © Ulster ... County Antrim was part of the large County of Ulster. It was first noted in a variety of places in the early 13th century . According to tradition he says the name derived from Robert Rule a man who saved the life of King Robert the Bruce by diverting away a ferocious bull about the gore the King to death. The same man was also associated with the Abbey of Coldstream Here they regrouped and made their way back to Ulster to coincide with the start of the Plantation in which their kinsmen the Gilmores were also partaking. It stems from the Old French mareschal, meaning a 'farrier'.) Another of the “Gille” names. MacBrearty has the same form in Gaelic but is most likely Irish. Origins in Ulster  English or Scottish Plantation. It came into special prominence with the arrival of Sir John Norris, who was responsible for the terrible massacre at Rathlin Island in 1575. Mac Fionnmhacháin or Mac Fhionnmhacháin. Imchad was one of Colla Fochríth's sons, and from him son Muiredach Méth would descend the Uí Méith. Nowry in Co. Derry, Nurse in Co. Kerry and Northbridge in west Cork. Displaced by James VI during the “pacification” of the borders post 1603 and fled to Fermanagh . Donovan (8436) 9. Many Morrisons choose to settle in Fermanagh where the watery landscape best suited the old skills they had learned in the Western Isles. It is likely that the Trumbels or Trimbels arrived in Ulster due to this scatterment. The propondrance of the name in Galloway is reflected in the poem by Symon c 1660 Origins in Ulster : Plantation Scottish The Síl Colla Fochríth, descend from Colla Fochríth, the first king of Airgíalla and one of Three Collas. The origins of this family are obscure but they were known to be associated with the church at Donagh. Sullivan (27196) 2. The Uí Briúin descend from Brion, son of Eochaid Mugmedon and Mongfind, and was an elder half brother of Niall of the Nine Hostages. Gaelic O’Conaill  Many of the Kilpatricks of Ulster especially in Fermanagh and Tyrone derive from East or West Kilpatrick in Dumbartonshire. MacBrearty, an exclusively Ulster name, is most common in counties Tyrone and Donegal. From the family Connell of Munster. In Scotland the name has been recorded in Ayrshire and Wigtownshire, where it is of Irish origin. The Uí Méith Mara, meaning "Omeath by the sea", was seated in Cualigne in northern County Louth. As regards Tyrone the Scottish connection may be more pertinent as a branch of the Ayrshire De Ros family were important undertakers in the Plantation. In Scotland the Johnston name also has a number of origins. It was a leading Co. Fermanagh sept up until and including the fifteenth century. He was tried on the false evidence of an informer and hanged at Greyabbey within sight of his home and church. Among the native Irish in Ulster to whom land was allowed at the time of the Plantation, and as part of the Plantation, were the following, the number of acres allowed each being also given : But all references point to Arbroath as the source of the surname. It is fairly common in both Scotland and Ireland from about the thirteenth century onwards but most in Ulster arrived in the post-Plantation period. The name is in Gaelic Ó Tomhrair, from a Norse personal name, Tomar. MacMurty may have the same Irish origin but has become lost in the Scots MacMurtry. These two became the progenitors of the two Cenél's (or kindreds) that would make up the Northern Uí Néill; the Cenél Eóghain based in Inishowen, with their capital at Ailech; and the Cenél Conaill centered in the rich area of Magh Ithe, in the valley of the river Finn. Although the position of marshall became one of great dignity, it is though that, in Scotland at least, the majority of Marshalls derive their name from the more humble occupational name. In the mid-nineteenth century O'Haras were still found concentrated in the barony of Lower Glenarm. The Parish of Tain in Ross was known to have so many families of the name that “nick names” had to be employed to identify them . It was one of the most well distributed of Irish surnames, mos… Janet Trumble appears in Crosiereige in 1674 and John Trimble in Elsrigle Parish of Libbertoun in 1689. By the middle of the 13th century the Ramsays are appearing as landowners in Angus. The Ulster Gilmores were a very powerful family controlling large territories in the baronies of Antrim Castlereagh and Lecale before the Plantation. Which later was to evolve as McKittrick the longer Williamson 16th and 17th century records of.... 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